Read The Plaque http://read-the-plaque.appspot.com Always read the plaque en-us Michigan's Capital http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/michigan-s-capital http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/michigan-s-capital 2017-05-22 21:09:07.609670 Michigan's Capital Michigan's Capital

MICHIGAN’S CAPITAL

 

Ahead lies Lansing, capital of Michigan.  In 1835, when the state was organized, Detroit was the capital, as it had been when Michigan was a territory.  The capital, after much debate, was moved to its present, more centrally located site in 1847.  The city of Lansing did not exist at that time, and the first capitol, completed by 1848, was built in a wilderness.  Today Lansing is the center for state government and also for major industries.  Michigan State University in in East Lansing.

 

Erected May 21, 1965, by Colonial Village, Everett and Northwest Kiwanis clubs of Lansing.

 

Submitted by

Bryan Arnold

@nanowhiskers

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Lincoln's Farewell to Illinois http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/lincoln-s-farewell-to-illinois http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/lincoln-s-farewell-to-illinois 2017-05-22 03:11:03.997510 Lincoln's Farewell to Illinois Lincoln's Farewell to Illinois

The plaque text: 

Abraham Lincoln made his farewell address to the people of Illinois at Tolono station February 11, 1861. “I am leaving you on an errand of national importance, attended as you are aware with considerable difficulties. Let us believe as some poet has expressed it, ‘Behind the cloud the sun is still shining.’ I bid you an affectionate farewell.”

Marker placed by Alliance Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, Urbana, Champaign, and the citizens of Tolono. July 1932.

The plaque story: 

I was on a weekend road trip with my dad in the late summer of 2004. We had departed Interstate 57 south of Champaign-Urbana to visit a nearby town. Here's my blog entry for September 11, 2004:

We got off the interstate just northwest of Tolono and drove into town on U.S. 45. I noticed while we were heading through that there was a sign for a historical marker. But as we passed the spot indicated -- the entrance to a gas station -- I didn't see a marker. We drove out the south end of town, turned around, and tried again. We turned in at the gravel entrance to the gas station, but still didn't see anything historic looking. But we did see a local constable parked in his Tolono squad car, apparently waiting for speeders . He lowered his passenger-side window as we rolled up.
"We were looking for that historical marker," I said.
"What?" he answered.
"Do you know anything about the historical marker that's supposed to be here?"
"A drunk took it down last winter. State still hasn't put it back up."
"Do you know what it was for? What the marker was for?
"I don't know. State's supposed to put it back up again."
I had my camera out, but I couldn't bring myself to ask whether I could take the officer's picture. I also didn't ask how long he'd been living in the area that he had no idea what this marker was about. Inquiries like that could be a threat to homeland security and speed-zone enforcement. Instead, Dad and I drove off to see Tolono; I was hoping there'd been an old station or stop of some kind I could photograph so I can send a shot to my old friend Gerry, who used to play the song so well. But there's not a whole lot happening in town, certainly no evidence of a rail-passenger platform anywhere. I shot a couple scenes along the Norfolk tracks anyway. Then we headed back to U.S. 45 to go south for a few miles and get back on I-57.
We passed the historical marker sign again, and going by the gas station I finally saw the monument. It was a tablet set into a boulder in among some sort of ever-greenery. The bushes kind of looked like landscaping for the gas station, and the boulder hadn't been visible when we were consulting local law enforcement about markers of historical significance. The police officer had been parked no more than 100 feet from the spot.
We halted again, and it turned out to be worth it this time. The marker commemorates what is said to be Lincoln's last speech in Illinois, on February 11, 1861, during a brief stop on his journey east to be inaugurated. The Lincoln log -- which gives a day-by-day account of this part of the 16th president's life and doings,  notes that Lincoln stopped further east, too, in Danville. Though he spoke to a crowd there, his remarks as recorded by reporters were less address-like than the spare, somber words recorded at Tolono
In any case, the poignancy in Lincoln's remarks lies in the fact he returned home to Illinois only when his funeral train bore him back in 1865. 
 

 

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For the School Yard http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/for-the-school-yard http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/for-the-school-yard 2017-05-22 03:10:50.163640 For the School Yard For the School Yard

THE BIRMINGHAM CIVIC SOCIETY 
To 
EDG Property 
for 
The School Yard 
2014 

RENAISSANCE AWARD


Submitted by @caddickbrown

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The Chatsworth Wreck http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/the-chatsworth-wreck http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/the-chatsworth-wreck 2017-05-22 03:10:47.652210 The Chatsworth Wreck The Chatsworth Wreck

The plaque story:

I first encountered this plaque more than 40 years ago, during one of my drives to and from college in Central Illinois. Here's something I wrote about it in 2006 after a sort of daylong local history field trip with my dad and brother:

 

We fueled up at the Freedom gas station in Lexington -- just $2.899 a gallon -- then headed north on old U.S. 66 to Chenoa. I wanted to take U.S. 24 east to Interstate 57 both because I knew there was a Dairy Queen along the way (in Fairbury) -- my dad's favorite road-trip stop -- and because I remembered a little piece of local history along the way: the Chatsworth Wreck.

Back in the mid-'70s, I stopped to read a historical marker just outside Chatsworth, one of the series of farm towns strung along U.S. 24. It reads:

THE CHATSWORTH WRECK 

MIDNIGHT, AUGUST 10-11, 1887

One-half mile north on the Toledo, Peoria & Western Railroad occurred one of the worst wrecks in American rail history. An excursion train - two engines and approximately twenty wooden coaches - from Peoria to Niagara Falls, struck a burning culvert . Of the 500 passengers about 85 perished and scores were injured.

Erected by the State of Illinois, 1954

We stopped at the DQ in Fairbury, then continued on through Chatsworth to the wreck marker, which is about two and a half miles east of town, nearly on the Livingston-Ford county line. One thing that's a little unclear when you're at the roadside, though, is exactly where the disaster occurred. The TP&W tracks -- the railroad still goes by that name -- are a half mile north of the highway. I wanted to see if we could find the site of the notorious "burning culvert" -- actually, a small wooden trestle. I imagined there could be a memorial or marker at the spot where the train left the tracks.

We parked at an electrical substation near the railroad's marked but unguarded level crossing. My sense, based on the marker's placement west of the section road that runs up the county line was that the wreck site was west of the road, too. Chris and I walked along the single track until we got to a culvert maybe a quarter-mile west of the road. It's not deep -- in fact, it's a narrow ditch that crosses under the track through an 8- or 10-foot-diameter steel pipe. The site is unprepossessing, just like every foot of track east or west of it to the horizon, and there was nothing to suggest we were at the scene of a sensational event.

After we walked back to the car and started east again on 24, Chris and I spotted another culvert -- this one an actual trestle -- just east of the county line. We turned around and hiked out to it, too. It's a much more satisfying place for a calamity: The tracks cross a bridge that's about 75 feet long and a good 20 feet above a sluggish little creek. We agreed that between the two possible sites, this seemed the more likely.

Back at home, I poked around online to see if I could find some account that sheds light on the wreck's precise location. Chatsworth had a newspaper, the Plaindealer, in 1887, and much more recently, a retired teacher and local historian there, Helen Louise Plaster Stoutemyer, published a book on the disaster, "The Train that Never Arrived." Eventually, I came across a Chatsworth native's website that includes the Plaindealer's first account of the tragedy. The story says the train left the tracks at "the first bridge west of the county line" -- the first place Chris and I looked, not the second. In addition to offering the salient facts, the writer has a lot to say about the impression the wreck left:

"The sight was most terrible. ... It was too horrible to admit of description.  The screams and moans of the wounded were heartrending, and the terror of the sight can not be imagined. ... To add to the terror of the scene a heavy thunder and lightening storm came up, and , with heavy rain made such a scene as would appall the bravest hearts. ... Even the strongest men were forced to tears as they heard and saw the anguish of the unhappy excursionists.  While many displayed strong courage, grit, and heroism, others were almost frantic, and those in attendance upon them were forced to hold them to prevent acts of insanity and self-destruction."

Submitted by Dan Brekke

 

 

 

 

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Kalisa La Ida's Cafe http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/kalisa-la-ida-s-cafe http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/kalisa-la-ida-s-cafe 2017-05-20 18:50:34.778000 Kalisa La Ida's Cafe Kalisa La Ida's Cafe

KALISA'S LA IDA CAFE 

KALISA MOORE, KNOWN AS "QUEEN OF CANNERY 
ROW," WAS BORN IN LATVIA AND CAME TO AMERICA 
AFTER WWII. SHE BRIDGE THE ERAS, OPENING HER 
GOURMET RESTAURANT WHEN MOST OF THE 
CANNERIES HAD CLOSED.

OVER THE YEARS "KALISA'S" BECAME A BOHEMIAN 
COFFEE HOUSE WHERE ARTISTS, WRITERS AND POETS 
"HUNG OUT." HER WEEKEND CABARET WAS BUSTLING 
WITH MUSICIANS, DANCERS AND OCCASIONALLY 
CELEBRITIES FROM THE MONTEREY JAZZ FESTIVAL. 

AS TIME PASSED AND CANNERY ROW WAS REBORN, 
KALISA BECAME A MAJOR FACTOR IN RETAINING 
MEMORIES OF STEINBECK'S ERA, PROMOTING 
TOURISM AND COMMERCE AS THE PRESIDENT OF 
THE CANNERY ROW FOUNDATION. 

FOR FIFTY YEARS SHE WAS A FRIEND TO THE 
FAMOUS AND A MOTHER TO THE NEEDY WITH A 
LOCAL FOLLOWING WHO KNEW AND LOVE HERE. 

KALISA'S LA IDA CAFE WAS A VERY SPECIAL 
TIME AND PLACE, AND KALISA WILL ALWAYS BE 
REMEMBERED AS "QUEEN OF CANNERY ROW."

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Edward Prince of Wales http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/edward-prince-of-wales http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/edward-prince-of-wales 2017-05-20 18:43:57.157740 Edward Prince of Wales Edward Prince of Wales

Located on the Queens terrace at new Parliament House this stone was originally on Capital Hill (see adjoining plaque)

Plaque reads:  

'His Royal Highness

Edward

Prince of Wales

Laid this stone

21 June 1920'

Submitted by: @IanThorp

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Prince and Princess of Wales http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/prince-and-princess-of-wales http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/prince-and-princess-of-wales 2017-05-20 18:43:56.079260 Prince and Princess of Wales Prince and Princess of Wales

Plaque reads:

'This plaque commemorates the visit of their Royal Highnesses

The Prince and Princess of Wales 

On the occasion of the re-laying of this stone on 24 March 1988

The stone was originally laid on capital hill by the Prince of Wales later King Edward VIII on 21 June 1920'

Submitted by: @IanThorp

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Willaim Henry Seward http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/willaim-henry-seward http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/willaim-henry-seward 2017-05-19 23:47:34.547430 Willaim Henry Seward Willaim Henry Seward

WILLIAM HENRY STEWARD 
PATRIOT AND STATESMAN 
AS GOVERNOR OF NEW YORK 
UNITED STATES SENATOR 
AND SECRETARY OF STATE 
GAVE TO THE PEOPLE OF 
THIS COUNTRY A LONG AND 
USEFUL LIFE CULMINATING 
IN HIS PURCHASE FOR THEM
OF THE TERRITORY OF 
ALASKA ON MARCH 30, 1867

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This Machine is a replicate of the machine that "Lucy" worked on "The I Love Lucy Show" http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/this-machine-is-a-replicate-of-the-machine-that-lucy-worked-on-the-i-love-lucy-show http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/this-machine-is-a-replicate-of-the-machine-that-lucy-worked-on-the-i-love-lucy-show 2017-05-19 23:44:07.900450 This Machine is a replicate of the machine that "Lucy" worked on "The I Love Lucy Show" This Machine is a replicate of the machine that

In the Cerreta Candy Company.

Submitted by IUeaststudent

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Here Stood Old Fort Dearborn 1803 - 1812 http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/here-stood-old-fort-dearborn-1803-1812 http://readtheplaque.com/plaque/here-stood-old-fort-dearborn-1803-1812 2017-05-19 23:41:09.871510 Here Stood Old Fort Dearborn 1803 - 1812 Here Stood Old Fort Dearborn 1803 - 1812


Submitted by @CitizenWald

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